Amazon Sales

  • Who Is Gloria Steinem? (Who Was...?)

    As a field reporter in the 1960s, Gloria Steinem worked hard to dig up important stories. She went undercover to expose the grim realities of gender inequality in America. As her message continued to grow, she became the spokeswoman of the women’s liberation movement and created the feminist publication, Ms. magazine. Steinem continues to speak and write about women and women’s roles in media and politics.

     
  • Who Was Queen Victoria?

    Her reign of 63 years and seven months is known as the Victorian Era, a period of industrial, cultural, scientific, and political change that was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire.  But Victoria was raised under close supervision and near isolation until she became Queen of the United Kingdom at the young age of 18. She married her first cousin, Albert, and had nine children who married into families across Europe. By the time she had earned the nickname “The Grandmother of Europe” and the title “Empress of India” it was indeed true that the sun never set on the British Empire. Publicly, she became a national icon, but privately, Who Was Queen Victoria?

     
  • Who Was Ernest Shackleton?

    As a boy he preferred reading sea stories to doing homework and, at age 16, became an apprentice seaman. Subsequently, Ernest Shackleton’s incredible journeys to the South Pole in the early 1900s made him one of the most famous explorers of modern times.  His courage in the face of dangerous conditions and unforeseeable tragedies reveal the great leader that he was. His historic 1914 journey aboard the Endurance has all the drama of an action movie.

     
  • Tomorrow is the First Day of School

    Review
    Children about to embark on that dismaying adventure--the first trip to school--will love author Maureen MacDowell's and illustrator Max Hergenrother's Tomorrow is the First Day of School. The surprise ending and warm gentle pictures will reassure them. And there's another surprise for their parents. --Joseph Slate 

    Product Description
    Butterflies flutter inside the tummy of a young girl as she prepares for the first day of school. At bedtime her mind races with countless questions - she is both nervous and excited as she tries to imagine what the first day will be like. The next morning her parents have her favorite breakfast ready, along with lots of love and hugs. With all the confidence she can muster, she bravely journeys off to the first day of school. Told in her voice, her story mirrors the feelings of anxiety and nervous exhilaration all children encounter the day before school. Children will be happy to find out that they are not alone and that everyone gets butterflies. 

     
  • Big Book of Contemporary Illustration

    Following the hugely successful Big Book of Fashion Illustration, this exciting new volume covers the broadest range of illustration available today. From digital drawing, pixilated pictures, and Photoshop fantasies to traditional sketching and painting, it’s a showstopping display of style and technique from more than 160 international artists. With close to 1,000 images, the illustrations range over such categories as architecture, fashion, logos, manga, maps, nature, people, packaging, and pop culture. This is an essential anthology for artists, creative professionals, students, and anyone who appreciates the fine art of illustration.  It also features my artwork.  Check it out.

     
  • The Hypochondriacs: Nine Tormented Lives

    Book Jacket Illustration By Max Hergenrother

    Charlotte Brontë found in her illnesses, real and imagined, an escape from familial and social duties, and the perfect conditions for writing. The German jurist Daniel Paul Schreber believed his body was being colonized and transformed at the hands of God and doctors alike. Andy Warhol was terrified by disease and by the idea of disease. Glenn Gould claimed a friendly pat on his shoulder had destroyed his ability to play piano. And we all know someone who has trawled the Internet in solitude, seeking to pinpoint the source of his or her fantastical symptoms.

    The Hypochondriacs is a book about fear and hope, illness and imagination, despair and creativity. It explores, in the stories of nine individuals, the relationship between mind and body as it is mediated by the experience, or simply the terror, of being ill. And, in an intimate investigation of those lives, it shows how the mind can make a prison of the body by distorting our sense of ourselves as physical beings. Through witty, entertaining, and often moving examinations of the lives of these eminent hypochondriacs—James Boswell, Charlotte Brontë, Charles Darwin, Florence Nightingale, Alice James, Daniel Paul Schreber, Marcel Proust, Glenn Gould, and Andy Warhol—Brian Dillon brilliantly unravels the tortuous connections between real and imagined illness, irrational fear and rational concern, the mind’s aches and the body’s ideas.